Common Individual Student Report/Parent Report Questions and Answers from New York State
 
Common Individual Student Report/Parent Report Questions and Answers

What is an ISR? ( Individual Student Report )

It is a report that provides information about a student’s results on the English language arts or mathematics assessments, such as the Scale Score and Performance Level for the current year and prior years, if applicable; Academic Intervention Services, if applicable; and SPI results (see below).

We lost our Individual Student Reports. How can I get another copy?

Due to student confidentiality, the New York State Education Department does not release any individual student data. If you are a parent, please contact your school for a copy of your child’s report.

How to obtain school results:

How can I see how my school/district did on the 2010 ELA and Math data compared to other schools?

All public and charter school data are posted on the Department’s website at:
http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/irts/pressRelease/20100728/home.html

How can I see nonpublic school data?

Send call to Gloria Salavatore 518-474-7965 or send the request to Dataquest@mail.nysed.gov

Questions about different sections on the ISR:

What is an SPI? (Standard Performance Index)

The SPI estimates the number of questions a child would have answered correctly if there were 100 items per standard. The child’s performance on each standard is compared with the SPI target range. A student scoring within the target range demonstrates the expected understanding of the standard. The target ranges vary across standards because some standards may contain more difficult items than others.

What is the official score - the SPI or the scale score and performance level?

The scale score and performance level are better indicators of the child’s performance on the New York State Learning Standards than SPIs. Therefore, the official score is the scale score and performance level.



Why do the SPIs on the back of an ISR all say “above the target” but the Scale Score on the front of the document says Level 3 (or Level 2 or
Level 1)?

It is possible to have all SPIs "above the target" yet still have the mean Scale Score at or below level 3; the SPI is not simply the percent of correct items on a given standard. Additional information is considered when computing SPIs. In technical terms, the procedure used to calculate the SPI is based on a combination of Item Response Theory (IRT) and Bayesian methodology. In non-technical terms, when calculating the SPI, the procedure looks at:
1. the number of items related to the objective that the student answered correctly;
2. the difficulty level of those items;
3. the student's performance on the rest of the items related to that objective. This method increases the accuracy of the SPI.

What is considered passing?

The Department now uses the terms “meeting the proficiency standards.” Performance Levels 3 and 4 are considered meeting the proficiency standard. For 2009-2010, the State Education Department has raised the bar for the Basic and Proficient performance levels. A child scoring at or above the new Basic standard (Level 2) is on track to pass the English or math Regents exam required for high school graduation. A child scoring at or above the new Proficiency standard (Level 3) is on track to earn a college-ready score on the English or math Regents Examination.

What are the different performance levels and what do they mean?

ELA

1. Level 1: Below Standard
• Student performance does not demonstrate an understanding of the English language arts knowledge and skills expected at this grade level.
• AIS: This year, your child did not demonstrate the knowledge and skills required by the ELA Learning Standards. Therefore, the school is required to provide academic intervention services for your child. Discuss the school's plan for these services with your child's teacher or school officials.

2. Level 2: Meets Basic Standard
• Student performance demonstrates a partial understanding of the English language arts knowledge and skills expected at this grade level.
• AIS: This year, your child partially demonstrated the knowledge and skills required by the ELA Learning Standards. For the 2010-11 school year only, the regulations for required extra help, or Academic Intervention Services (AIS), have been adjusted. The cut score for AIS will be identical to the 2009 score that required students to receive AIS (650). If your child scored below 650, the school is required to provide academic intervention services for your child. If your child scored a Level 2 but above the 650 score, please check with your child’s school for its AIS policy. For students scoring close to Level 3, monitoring your child's performance may be sufficient. Please discuss the school’s plan for these services with your child’s teacher or school officials.

3. Level 3: Meets Proficiency Standard
• Student performance demonstrates an understanding of the English language arts knowledge and skills expected at this grade level.
• AIS: This year, your child demonstrated the knowledge and skills required by the ELA Learning Standards.

4. Level 4: Exceeds Proficiency Standard
• Student performance demonstrates a thorough understanding of the English language arts knowledge and skills expected at this grade level.
• AIS: This year, your child demonstrated the knowledge and skills required by the ELA Learning Standards.

Math

1. Level 1: Below Standard
• Student performance does not demonstrate an understanding of the mathematics content expected at this grade level.
• AIS: This year, your child did not demonstrate the knowledge and skills required by the Mathematics Learning Standard. Therefore, the school is required to provide academic intervention services for your child. Discuss the school's plan for these services with your child's teacher or school officials.

2. Level 2: Meets Basic Standard
• Student performance demonstrates a partial understanding of the mathematics content expected at this grade level.
• AIS: This year, your child partially demonstrated the knowledge and skills required by the Mathematics Learning Standard. For the 2010-11 school year only, the regulations for required extra help, or Academic Intervention Services (AIS), have been adjusted. The cut score for AIS will be identical to the 2009 score that required students to receive AIS (650). If your child scored below 650, the school is required to provide academic intervention services for your child. If your child scored a Level 2 but above the 650 score, please check with your child’s school for its AIS policy. For students scoring close to Level 3, monitoring your child's performance may be sufficient. Please discuss the school’s plan for these services with your child’s teacher or school officials.

3. Level 3: Meets Proficiency Standard
• Student performance demonstrates an understanding of the mathematics content expected at this grade level.
• AIS: This year, your child demonstrated the knowledge and skills required by the Mathematics Learning Standard.


4. Level 4: Exceeds Proficiency Standard
• Student performance demonstrates a thorough understanding of the mathematics content expected at this grade level.
• AIS: This year, your child demonstrated the knowledge and skills required by the Mathematics Learning Standard.

When are Academic Intervention Services (AIS) required?

The Department has established four State-designated levels of performance. All public and charter school students who score below the State-designated performance level (performance level 3) must be provided academic intervention services, which must commence in the semester immediately following the administration of the test. For the 2010-11 school year only, the regulations for required extra help, or Academic Intervention Services (AIS), have been adjusted. The cut score for AIS will be identical to the 2009 score that required students to receive AIS (650). If the child scored below 650, the school is required to provide academic intervention services for the child. If the child scored a Level 2 but above the 650 score, then AIS policy is up to the school. For students scoring close to Level 3, monitoring the child's performance may be sufficient. It is up to the school to determine a plan for these services – parents should check with the child’s teacher or school officials.

The Elwood Board of Education has supported continued service for all Level 1 and Level 2 students in AIS programs within their buildings.


Questions about the ELA and/or Math tests:

How can I get a copy of the test?

The New York State Education Department’s Office of State Assessments posts the various assessments on the web at: http://www.nysedregents.org/testing/elaei/09exams/home.htm

How can I get a copy of my child’s test to see what questions my child got wrong on the test?

After all English Language Arts or Mathematics Tests have been scored and all scores have been recorded on students’ permanent records, a student and his or her parents/guardians have the right to review the student’s own test books and answer sheets. Test books and answer sheets should be reviewed in the presence of the principal or the principal’s designee to ensure that no changes are made as they are being reviewed. Copies of test books and answer sheets may be provided to students and their parents upon request after the scanning centers have returned the answer sheets to the district.


How do I know what questions belongs to which standard (ELA) or strand (Mathematics)?

The item maps linking question to test standard/strand can be found on the New York State Education Department’s web site at:
http://www.nysedregents.org/testing/elaei/09exams/home.htm

Who scores the tests?

It is the responsibility of the public school, public school district, nonpublic school, or charter school to score their own tests by using one of the following methods:

1. Regional Scoring
2. Schools from two districts
3. Three or more schools within a district
4. Two schools within a district
5. One school

Once the tests are scored locally, the answer documents are scanned by the local RIC or Big 5 scanning center. The data are then submitted to the Student Information Repository System (SIRS) and then sent to the contractor CTB McGraw-Hill for scaling, scoring and equating.

What happens if I think a child’s paper has been scored incorrectly?

When the teacher scoring committee completes the scoring process, test scores must be considered final and must be entered onto students’ answer sheets. Principals and other administrative staff in a school or district do not have the authority to set aside the scores arrived at by the teacher scoring committee and rescore student examination papers or to change any scores assigned through the procedures described in this manual and in the scoring materials provided by the Department. Any principal or administrator found to have done so, except in the circumstances described below, will be in violation of Department policy regarding the scoring of these tests. Teachers and administrators who violate Department policy with respect to scoring State examinations may be subject to disciplinary action in accordance with Sections 3020 and 3020-a of Education Law or to action against their certification pursuant to Part 83 of the Regulations of the Commissioner of Education. If an administrator has substantial reason to believe that the teacher scoring committee has failed to accurately score student answer papers on any examination, the administrator must first obtain permission in writing from the Office of State Assessment before arranging for or permitting a rescoring of student papers. The written request to the Office of State Assessment must come from the superintendent of a public school district or the chief administrative officer of a nonpublic or charter school and must include the examination title, date of administration, and number of students whose papers would be subject to such rescoring. This request must also include a statement explaining why the administrator believes that the teacher scoring committee failed to score appropriately and, thus, why he or she believes rescoring the examination papers is necessary. As part of this submission, the school administrator must make clear his or her understanding that such extraordinary re-rating may be carried out only by a full committee of teachers constituted in accordance with the scoring guidelines presented above and fully utilizing the scoring materials for this test provided by the Department. The Department occasionally finds it necessary to notify schools of a revision to the scoring key and rating guide for an examination. Should this occur after the scoring committee has completed its work, the principal is authorized to have appropriate members of the scoring committee review students’ responses only to the specific question(s) referenced in the notification and to adjust students’ final examination scores when appropriate. This is the only circumstance in which the school is not required to notify or obtain approval from the Department to correct students’ final examination scores. Questions concerning the administration of these tests should be directed to the Office of State Assessment at 518-474-5902 or 518-474-8220.